Violinist Tim Yip began his studies at age four at the Preucil School of Music, the Midwestern capital for Suzuki string education. He was raised in the San Francisco Bay Area and studied intensively with Byung Woo Kim, concert master of the San Jose Symphony.  Tim went on to study at UCLA with Mark Kaplan, a student of Dorothy Delay. When Mark Kaplan took a new position at Indiana University, Tim continued studies with the first violinist of the Ysaye String Quartet, Guillaume Sutre. Tim was a student of the late Aaron Rosand, Curtis faculty, at the teacher’s intensive program in New York. Now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Tim pursues doctoral studies under David Perry, another student of Delay.

Tim obtained a certificate from the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory and St. Petersburg Conservatory in Russia where he studied with masters of the Soviet violin school: Alexander Kirov in Moscow and Anatolly Davidovitch Reznikovsky in St Petersburg.

He has performed extensively in Los Angeles, northern California, and Madison, Wisconsin. He has performed in Weill Recital Hall of Carnegie Hall in New York. Tim has performed chamber music collaborations with Anne Akiko Meyers, Richard O’Neill, Guillaume Sutre, Stuart Canin, Mark O’Connor, and Antonio Lysy.

Highly regarded as an educator, Tim works with students to develop their musical and technical skills. Many of his students have won orchestra leadership roles and competitions (See Student Achievements).  Students from his studio have graduated and gone on to institutions such as USC, UCLA, New England Conservatory, University of Washington, and Stanford, among others.

He is a skilled administrator and serves as a manager at the Division of Diversity at UW-Madison where he supports students of color as they navigate work and academics on campus.

Tim has won several grants to conduct dissertation research in the field of string pedagogy.  In 2017 and 2019 he attended the Juilliard teachers’ symposium for violin studies, where he observed and learned from leading teachers in the field. He continues to explore the field of violin teaching, particularly relating to American string pioneer John Kendall, The Suzuki method, and the Russian violin school.